Posts in March 2016

  1. Increase in ADHD (mis)Diagnosis

    [ By on March 26, 2016 ]

    The emphasis in our public education model is increasingly becoming about memorization and focus. Generally, over the past 10 years, schools have become more focused on textbook information and teaching to the test rather than being focused on lateral thinking and free thought. In addition, school days have become longer and the amount of homework students are assigned has increased, leaving less free time throughout the day. It is natural for young people to need to expend energy, and the result of not doing so because of lack of free time is constantly bored students with pent up energy and no way to deal with it, causing inability to focus during class. In the current education model, focus is necessary ...

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  2. Are Savior Siblings Ethical?

    [ By on March 18, 2016 ]

    Molly Nash was born with a fatal genetic disorder called Faconi-anemia, in which the only treatment is a bone-marrow transplant. If it were not for her brother, Adam, she most likely would have died before her 10th birthday from leukemia. Lisa and John Nash decided to have another baby in order to save their daughter, and with the help of Dr. John Wagner, they used in-vitro fertilization to create embryos that could be tested for Fanconi anemia and for the same tissue type as Molly. After many attempts of in-vitro fertilization, they finally got a healthy embryo that could be used for a bone marrow transplant, which Molly had soon after Adam was born. This anecdote about a savior sibling is ...

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  3. Medical Tourism: Boon or Burden?

    [ By on March 18, 2016 ]

    In an increasingly interconnected world where industries regularly outsource production, research and intellectual talent, health care until recently has remained local. It is in this climate that the globalization of health care has given rise to the practice of medical tourism. Medical tourism involves travelers going abroad for the purpose of obtaining medical care in another country. Some medical tourists are seeking care that is unavailable at home while others are underinsured or uninsured Americans looking for an affordable alternative to the prohibitive cost of medical procedures at home.

    A patient might decide to travel abroad for services that are illegal or unavailable in their home country but are legal in the destination country such as experimental stem

    ...

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  4. Should the United States pass nationally mandated vaccines?

    [ By on March 16, 2016 ]

    In December of 2014, the "most magical place on Earth" became a little bit less magical when over 100 cases of measles emerged, all connected to a shocking outbreak at the theme park. While Mickey and Minnie Mouse may enjoy polka-dots and various other sorts of spots, falling ill with measles, a seemingly eradicated disease, is a far cry from the fun experienced on Space Mountain. The 2014 Disneyland outbreak exposed the public to a reality hard to conceive of: according to the National Immunization Survey, nearly 9 million children in the United States are not fully vaccinated against measles. Although many consider vaccines to be just another blip on the radar of their yearly physical, the popularity of the ...

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  5. Is it Ethical to Use Fetal Tissue for Medical Research?

    [ By on March 16, 2016 ]

    The subject of whether or not it is ethical to use aborted fetal tissue for medical research is a controversial and sensitive one. Many people believe that the use of this tissue is unethical for similar reasons to why one may believe abortion to be unethical; that a fetus is a human life. Moreover, videos of Planned Parenthood selling aborted fetal tissue to biomedical research groups has sparked outrage. Many believe that it is unethical to sell fetal tissue, for it puts a monetary value on human life, thereby devaluing it. However, the way in which fetal tissue is used in medical research is so beneficial to human subsistence that the argument that the tissue came from a "human life" is ...

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  6. Is it moral to genetically design babies?

    [ By on March 16, 2016 ]

    Imagine walking into a doctor's office and telling your doctor that you and your partner finally decided what traits and characteristics you want your unborn child to have.  You say, "I would like my son to have my straight blonde hair, ear for music, and patience and my partner's height, green eyes, and athleticism."  The doctor tells you to come back in two weeks to be inseminated.  Your baby grows up and possesses all of these qualities.  Is this moral? Should we be able to pick and chose what traits we think are superior?  How would this effect our society and how we love and care for our children? Would this option be equally available to everyone? I think that if it ...

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  7. The Pill and Contraceptives: Are They Ethical?

    [ By on March 16, 2016 ]

    An interesting bioethical dilemma-- at least, to me anyway-- is the issue of birth control. While it can be seen as controversial due to some religious arguments about it, as a whole is the idea of preventing pregnancy ethical? Is it similar to abortion? Personally, I believe that women should be able to have the option to take birth control, not only because they should have the freedom to make choices about their bodies, but also because I don't see anything wrong with it, ethically. Preventing the "creation of a child" from happening in the first place is not the same as "killing a child" that has already been conceived. I also don't consider abortion immoral-- but if we had to rank them, ...

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  8. Should Inmates Be able to Opt for the Death Penalty

    [ By on March 14, 2016 ]

    The United States Prison system is a form of theatre. What Judge Judy and the most secure supermax prisons in America have in common is that they function to teach a lesson: crime is a one way street to pain. All aspects of our criminal justice system employ procedures that act to fulfill the goal of teaching a lesson. Solitary confinement, trial by jury, and even the death penalty fall under the scope of the criminal justice system's "teaching function". But they do not do a good job. While the prison population quadrupled in the 70's and 80's, crime rate experienced an overall rise. Our population desires vengeance for those who inflict harm upon their communities even though it does ...

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