Posts in December 2016

  1. Do we care more about the player, or more about the game? NFL concussions

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    People question whether or not the NFL does enough to promote player safety since so many players suffer from visible and non visible injuries. In addition to broken bones, players get concussion which can lead to long term brain damage. They can lead to "depression, cognitive dysfunction, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease." Knowing what causes these concussions can have on a biological level, why then do we allow players to risk their lives on a daily basis? Andrew Brandt, a sports lecturer, explained that “The rules are about keeping the most enhanced product possible out there. When you have your star players unavailable , you are not only hurting the brand of the specific team, but the brand of ...

    continue reading…

  2. We Might Have Gender Neutral Bathrooms, But Should The Whole World?

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    Here at Riverdale, in every building there is at least one gender neutral bathroom, to provide individuals who do not feel comfortable subjecting themselves to making the decision to use a bathroom that might not represent their gender identity. In my eyes, this is very progressive, but recently, this idea of having gender neutral bathrooms has been very controversial. A common idea is that these bathrooms will destroy any sense of privacy, and also, some might feel uncomfortable with someone who might be perceived as the opposite sex, entering the same bathroom as them. Some thing that are used to counter this, are: Your bathroom in your own home is a unisex bathroom. The bathrooms on planes are unisex bathrooms. Some restaurant bathrooms ...

    continue reading…

  3. How should international organizations, like the WHO, be responsible for global health? by Fred Meckler

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    Since the WHO (World Health Organization) infected a large part of the Egyptian population with HCV (Hepatitis C Virus), the WHO has been under scrutiny for the many health issues that it has created for the Egyptian population and many others. More recently, the FDA's (Food and Drug Administration) inconsistent protocol for approving drugs has been on display with the recent approval of drugs like Flibanserin and Sarepta. These issues that seem to repeat itself across bring up questions about what role larger institutions should play in the health of individuals.

    How should international organizations, like the WHO, be responsible for global health? What responsibility does the WHO have to ensure that its procedures and actions will benefit

    ...

    continue reading…

  4. How can we solve the health care crisis? by Jake Seeherman

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    If someone is in dire need of medical attention but does not have health care or is not able to afford paying for the necessary care they need, should they still be taken care of? What if they are in a life threatening position where the only way of surviving is from the care and help of a proper medical physician? “64 million Americans still can’t afford health care.” Some people believe that as humans we have the right to proper medical attention whether we can afford it or not. While others realize that it is technically against the law to receive help with the knowledge that the patient can not afford it, and if given the help the doctors ...

    continue reading…

  5. Ethical Issues in Assisted Reproductive Technology by Grace Haughton

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is a form of medical intervention in the development of a pregnancy. ART is commonly used in order to improve an infertile woman, or couple’s chance of becoming pregnant – infertility being clinically defined as being unable conceive a child after 12 months of active attempts. ART involved the separation of procreation and sexual intercourse through techniques such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), gamete intra-fallopian transfer (GIFT); gestational surrogate mothering, gamete donation, sex selection, and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    Assisted reproductive technology often raises complicate ethical questions for the health care professionals using the technology and the individuals involved in the process. One ethical dilemma surrounds the issue of preserving and creating embryos. Often,

    ...

    continue reading…

  6. Ethical issues in Gender Reassignment Surgery by Ariana Nakhla

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    While the United States has developed the laws and language to protect transgender individuals, there still lies debate about the ethics of reassignment surgery and the administration of hormones. Many individuals question which forms of transition are the safest, what age is appropriate to begin transitioning, and how to cater to those who don’t have access to the medical resources necessary for transition. While there are no clear answers to any of these concerns from ethical or medical perspectives, it is clear that in order to uphold the rights of transgender individuals, hormone therapy at the very least should be accessible across the nation.

    According to a study conducted by the AMA Journal of Ethics, 26.7% of

    ...

    continue reading…

  7. Are PEDs morally for athletic use? by Jake Seeherman

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    PED's or performance enhancing drugs are used by athletes "to improve performance and increase muscle." Some people oppose PED's because they believe it gives users an unfair advantage over players who don't use. Although some athletes who use PED's are dependent upon them to succeed.

    The NCAA and all professional sports leagues have banned the use of PED's. They believe the "use of performance enhancers is cheating because it violates constitutive rules of the activity." However as doctor Julian Savulescu says  "Nature is not fair""Some gymnasts are more flexible, and some basketball players are seven feet tall. By allowing everyone to take performance enhancing drugs,

    ...

    continue reading…

  8. GMOs: Ethical or not? by Taymor Idliby

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    A genetically modified organism, or GMO is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. When studying the ethics behind the question as to whether or not we should implement GMOs in our society, through studying the health risks to the consumer of GMOs, as well as the failure of GMOs to increase crop yield, one can conclude that we clearly should absolutely not.

    To begin, GMOs are completely unsafe for any consumer. This idea been made painstakingly clear by the reliable American Academy of Environmental Medicine, or AAEM, which urges all doctors around the world to steer clear from prescribing foods with GMOs for diets. They cite studies showing that

    ...

    continue reading…

  9. Do doctors too often prescribe antidepressant and anxiety medications? by Anna Mestel

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    A controversial topic that is commonly discussed in America is the question about the usage of prescribed antidepressant and anxiety medications. These two specific medicines are among the most frequently used drugs by people in this century. While these drugs can be very useful for people who really need the help, there are also a lot of people who don’t necessarily require the use of medicine, but are simply prescribed it as a so-called “easy fix.” Prescribing medical drugs are easy; however, are they as safe as they seem? The American Psychological Association states “the use of psychotropic drugs by adult Americans increased 22 percent from 2001 to 2010, with one in five adults now taking

    ...

    continue reading…

  10. Can human tissues be used in the lab by scientists? by Fred Meckler

    [ By on December 18, 2016 ]

    Can human tissues be used in the lab by scientists? All the time, Scientists are using human tissues to diagnose diseases and conduct experiments. Sometimes, scientists do ethically questionable or inappropriate things with the human tissues they create. None of these ethical cases are more well known than HeLa cells. While HeLa cells proved invaluable for the advancement of science, the family of Henrietta Lacks was never notified nor compensated for the sacrifice that the family has made for the benefit of science and for all humans.

    How do we approach human tissues in a scientific lab? Should we ned approach these tissues with more respect than animal tissues or is there no moral distinction between animal tissues and

    ...

    continue reading…