Posts in Middle

  1. Day 142: Ellie, 6th Grader

    [ By on May 16, 2013 ]

    I recently visited New Orleans as part of a service learning trip with middle and upper school students. Even though I was only there for three days, I discovered how amazing the people are in New Orleans. On the first night, Adrian told us about how the people in New Orleans are so welcoming and kind, a bit unlike here in our city. He told us that if you waved to anyone passing by on the street, they’d almost always wave back. We tested it out on some people and every time, even some bikers who had their hands full managed to wave back at us. That definitely was pretty cool especially because in New York City people don’t wave ...

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  2. Day 137: Rachel, 8th Grader

    [ By on May 08, 2013 ]

    The last night of the Nola 2013 trip, we were all sitting outside of an Italian restaurant expecting nothing but an ordinary dinner reminiscing about the spectacular trip we had had so far.  During our meal, we all suddenly turned around surprised, as a bike-riding musician, calling himself “the biker ballad,” stopped by our restaurant to belt out a few tunes. We each gave a few dollars to the man, not only for the great show he put on, but for the comfort and warmth he brought us and the joy of the night as we all sang along to some of our favorite songs. Through cracking jokes like, “If you want my newest record, you can find it in ...

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  3. Day 132: Caroline, 8th Grader

    [ By on May 02, 2013 ]

    Grow Dat Youth Farm in partnership with Tulane University and the Edible Schoolyard creates job opportunities for high school students in order to support public health, local economies and a sustainable food system in South Louisiana. The farm provides a healthy and supportive work environment for high school-aged youth from New Orleans who face limited job opportunities. Through a structured application process, Grow Dat Farm conscientiously recruits a mix of students: 20% of whom have already demonstrated leadership skills inside or outside of school, 20% of whom are at- risk of poor performance at school, and 60% of whom are students that are neither excelling nor failing at school. Success in the program is defined by students’ consistent participation, their ...

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  4. Day 127: Malaika, 8th Grader

    [ By on April 25, 2013 ]

    During our trip to New Orleans, we visited the Akili Academy.  The Akili Academy of New Orleans is a charter school for students from kindergarten through fifth grade.  Similar to other large cities in the United States, New Orleans has many people living in poverty.  In 2005 when Hurricane Katrina hit, many more people were living in poverty.  Many of these people included children who only looked to get through the day, rather than planning on what their futures would be like.  Children are not expected to choose their pat in life at an early age.  But, they are allowed to dream.  Living with very little made it hard for kids to dream and for a promise that these dreams ...

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  5. Day 124: Haylee, 6th Grader

    [ By on April 19, 2013 ]

    Day 124: Haylee, 6th Grader At the recent diversity conference I attended in Philadelphia, discussions zeroed in on bullying, acceptance, and society's expectations.  The stories and experiences covered a wide range of ages, races, differences, genders, economic class, and disabilities. There was one story that really stood out to me and that was about a boy with a disability (which caused him to be in wheelchair).  The boy with a disability was in a store just shopping alone when a boy who was with his mom started making faces at the kid in the wheelchair.  When the mom caught the boy making faces, she said that if he kept doing mean and disrespectful actions like that God would punish him and make ...

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  6. Day 119: Elsa, Sixth Grader

    [ By on April 10, 2013 ]

    Several Middle School students and I recently traveled to Philadelphia to attend the Middle School Student Diversity Leadership Conference with the theme “A Journey of Identity and Inclusion.”  After the long bus ride, we entered a big room filled with curious students.  After an inspiring welcome speech by Mykee Fowlin, we split up into discussion groups. We talked about many different things, but there are a few topics that touched both me and my peers. There is a huge difference from what you are supposed to do, and what you need to do. You shouldn’t stop to talk or smile to strangers you see walking down the street, but you can brighten up their day with a quick smile or ...

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  7. Day 114: Katie, Seventh Grader

    [ By on April 03, 2013 ]

    I learned today that you should not cram for tests and quizzes—instead you should start studying when you first hear about them.  I know that everyone is always telling you not to cram, but until recently, I did not really get why you do not want to cram.  One week, I had an org+ final on Wednesday, a Latin quiz on Thursday, and a math quiz and science test that Friday.  It was a very stressful week.  Now, I will definitely study ahead of time. If I had studied ahead of time, then I could spend more time doing what I wanted instead of studying like crazy the last few days before my tests and quizzes.  Ms. Terkeltaub always says, "It ...

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  8. Day 110: Brandon, Seventh Grader

    [ By on March 13, 2013 ]

    I was late the first day of school at my new school and I was very worried about the new people I would meet and how I would approach them. “All new kids think about that stuff so why should I be like all new kids, I am going to be different I am going to be the best new kid they ever saw”, I thought to myself. My mom decided to come with me to explain why I was late and to make me feel more comfortable. I stepped into the building as bold as ever and with each step my confidence dropped, dropped and dropped till I just wanted to go back to my car. When we got ...

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  9. Day 105: Solei, Seventh Grader

    [ By on March 06, 2013 ]

    I recently went on an afterschool trip to The Mosholu Daycare Center. I read Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin, my favorite children's book to the children at the center. The wonder in their young eyes was so cute, it reminded me of my brother when he was younger. However, I now hate my brother, because as he grew older he became more annoying than I thought he would be. He does not appreciate these type of stories anymore, and all my baby books that I had that were passed on to him have gone to waste, due to alluring video game consoles such as PS3 and Xbox 360. I remember that I always wanted to read ...

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  10. Day 100: Gigi, Seventh Grader

    [ By on February 27, 2013 ]

    In English class we are reading Julius Caeser, a play by William Shakespeare. To help us get familiar with Shakespeareian language so that we are able to read the play easily, my teacher gave us three sheets; One with Shakespeareian insults, one with Shakespeareian compliments, and the last with Shakespeareian quotes. They were all very interesting new words that we would not usually use in everyday language. We spent the class reciting the insults, compliments, and quotes in iambic pentameter, which leads me to another story. In every piece of literature written by Shakespeare, he uses a form of language called iambic pentameter. In iambic pentameter, one places emphasis on the second syllable instead of the first. For example, ta-TUM ta-TUM. ...

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