Posts in November 2014

  1. Stem Cell Cloning

    [ November 18, 2014 ]

    Last year, scientists succeeded in cloning human embryonic stem cells (hESC) that may aid in developing replacement tissue to treat serious and fatal diseases and even create cloned babies in the future. Stem cells are biological cells that have the ability to develop into many different types of specialized cells during early life and growth. In addition, they serve as an internal repair system in certain tissues, infinitely dividing as long as the organism is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential to either remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a neuron, a red blood cell, or a brain cell. In some organs, such ...

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  2. Effect of nontuberculous mycobacteria on lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis

    [ November 18, 2014 ]

    There has been much debate about whether to treat airway colonization with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The rationale for therapy is based upon an association between NTM colonization and severity of CF. However, while patients with CF are at an increased risk of colonization with NTM, it is unknown if NTM contributes to decreasing lung function. This study retrospectively evaluated whether NTM colonization in adult patients with CF is associated with impairment of lung function. In addition, the effect of cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD), and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) on NTM colonization was evaluated. Data from adult CF patients enrolled in the Gunnar Esiason Adult Cystic Fibrosis Lung Program at Columbia UniversityMedical Center in ...

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  3. Expression of Hsp70 in Spartina alterniflora as a bio-indicator for environmental impact

    [ November 18, 2014 ]

    The long-term goal of our research is to evaluate the health of the Bronx River, Bronx, NY by gauging the effect of environmental stresses on organisms native to the river. Due to the heavy dumping of industrial waste and nearby urbanization, the Bronx River has experienced a dramatic decline in water quality and estuarine health. Specifically, we explored the role of smooth cord grass, Spartina alterniflora, as an indicator of relative environmental stress. Our approach was to monitor expression of the universal stress responding protein, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in grass collected from the Bronx River estuary as well as a relatively less impacted site in Greenwich Cove, Greenwich, CT. We quantified and compared constitutive and heat-induced expression of ...

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