Posts by Jason Gold

Jason Gold, PhD is the Consulting Psychologist to the Middle and Upper School at RCS. At Riverdale, Jason works with individual students and their parents, is a member of the Learning Resource Team, and consults with deans, faculty and administration on mental health related topics. Jason and KC collaborate on a number of activities in the Middle and Upper Schools and together they lead the Middle School Family Matters group. Outside of RCS, Jason has been in private practice in clinical psychology on the Upper West Side since 1999. He specializes in working with children, adolescents, and their families in psychotherapy, and he also provides psychoeducational evaluations. He is a graduate of the New York Psychoanalytic Institute and is a clinical supervisor at both the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, and the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology at City University of New York. He is interested in the interwoven nature of psychology, literature/arts, and our growing understanding of neuroscience. Jason has also been a practitioner of various forms of yoga for the last seven years. He lives in Riverdale with his wife (a teacher currently working for the NYC DOE's Office of School Programs and Parnerships) and their two children.

  1. Article on the connection between sleep deprivation and ADHD symptoms

    [ By on May 07, 2013 ]

    Diagnosing the Wrong Deficit  Link to article Also see related letter by Marc Weissbluth: To the Editor: Associating A.D.H.D symptoms with sleep problems is nothing new. Children who do not breathe well during sleep were described in 1914 by Dr. W. L. Ballenger: “Restlessness during the night is a prominent symptom. ... Daytime restlessness is also a characteristic sign. ... The child is fretful and peevish, or is inclined to turn from one amusement to another. ... The mental faculties are often much impaired ... difficult attention ... is very often present. The child is listless and has difficulty in applying himself continuously to his play, studies, ...

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  2. Organizational Tools and Technologies for Students – From the RCS Learning Research Team

    [ By on December 06, 2012 ]

    Organizational Tools and Technologies  

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  3. Attentional Disorders Links

    [ By on December 04, 2012 ]

    Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) TeensHealth on ADHD ADHD and Teens: Information for Parents

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  4. Learning Differences/Disabilities Links

    [ By on December 04, 2012 ]

    Learning Disabilities Association New York City - website National Center for Learning Disabilities - website The New York Branch of the International Dyslexia Association - website  

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  5. Parenting Links

    [ By on December 04, 2012 ]

    Madeline Levine, PhD PBS - The Whole Child Faber/Mazlish (Authors of: How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk) Claudia M Gold, MD (Author of Keeping Your Child in Mind) Iowa State University: The Science of Parenting Commonsense Media - Setting Computer Limits The Collaborative Problem Solving Approach  

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  6. Substance Use and Abuse Links

    [ By on December 04, 2012 ]

    Teens and Drug Abuse Freedom Institute NYC www.abovetheinfluence.org www.drugabuse.gov

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  7. General Emotional/Mental Health Links

    [ By on December 04, 2012 ]

    National Institute of Mental Health HHS - Office of Adolescent Health PBS - It's My Life - Emotions www.teenshealth.org Collaborative Problem Solving American Psychological Association American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry  

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  8. Five Misconceptions About Learning Disabilities

    [ By on December 04, 2012 ]

    From: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/03/five-misconceptions-about-learning-disabilities.html HEALTH -- March 16, 2012 at 5:34 PM EDT Five Misconceptions About Learning Disabilities By: Jason Kane Getty illustration by Zigy Kaluzny In the classroom, it starts simply -- sometimes with a struggle to sound out simple words; sometimes with trouble telling time, memorizing the times tables or learning left from right. It often ends simply, too: with a troubling statistic. One in five of the American students identified as having a learning disability will walk away from their education. That's compared to a dropout rate of 8 percent in the general population. Just as startling: Close to half of the secondary students currently identified as learning disabled ...

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  9. Overview of Typical Development (physical, social, mental, emotional) of Ten-to-Fourteen-Year-Olds

    [ By on December 03, 2012 ]

    From: "Your-Ten-To-Fourteen-Year-Old" by Louise Bates Ames, PhD, Frances L. Ilg, MD & Sidney M Baker, MD - Gesell Institute of Human Development   In this resource on typical development of children in middle school years, the authors highlight the importance of understanding the natural occurrence of alternating periods of equilibrium and disequilibrium. According to these authors, typical developmental patterns for the ten-to-fourteen-year-old child are as follows: Age 10 – Age of equilibrium, good adjustment, comfortable functioning internally and between child and others. Age 11 – Opposite of 10. A time of breaking up, discord and discomfort. It is a time of loosening up, of snapping old bonds, ...

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  10. Stress Links

    [ By on November 07, 2012 ]

    An excellent resource on stress.   A Ted talk by the author of "Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers" Kidshealth.org "stress center"  

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