Posts in Development

Typical development is often difficult to describe because of the great variability in what is expected of children of different ages. However, observations from developmental specialists have led to certain typical characteristics, hallmarks for the different ages. As our focus in this blog is on the middle school years, roughly children from ages ten to fourteen, posts in this section will cover typical developmental achievements and challenges of this age group. One of the primary resources for this section is the book, “Your Ten-To-Fourteen-Year-Old” by Louise Bates Ames, PhD, Frances L Ilg, MD, and Sidney M Baker, MD of the Gesell Institute of Human Development. Their subtitle, “From peer pressure to sibling rivalry to sexual awareness – everything you need to know about your ten-to-fourteen-year-old” seems to capture some of the essence of this age group.

Also in this section will be references to typical cognitive and intellectual development as well as to learning differences and disorders.

Topics/Posts
* Overview of Typical Development (physical, social, mental, emotional) of Ten-to-Fourteen-Year-Olds
* Middle School — Developments in the Peer Group
* Five Misconceptions About Learning Disabilities (From PBS NEWSHOUR)
* Learning Differences/Disabilities Links
* Attentional Disorders Links
* Organizational Tools and Technologies for Students

  1. Article on the connection between sleep deprivation and ADHD symptoms

    [ By on May 07, 2013 ]

    Diagnosing the Wrong Deficit  Link to article Also see related letter by Marc Weissbluth: To the Editor: Associating A.D.H.D symptoms with sleep problems is nothing new. Children who do not breathe well during sleep were described in 1914 by Dr. W. L. Ballenger: “Restlessness during the night is a prominent symptom. ... Daytime restlessness is also a characteristic sign. ... The child is fretful and peevish, or is inclined to turn from one amusement to another. ... The mental faculties are often much impaired ... difficult attention ... is very often present. The child is listless and has difficulty in applying himself continuously to his play, studies, ...

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  2. Organizational Tools and Technologies for Students – From the RCS Learning Research Team

    [ By on December 06, 2012 ]

    Organizational Tools and Technologies  

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  3. Attentional Disorders Links

    [ By on December 04, 2012 ]

    Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) TeensHealth on ADHD ADHD and Teens: Information for Parents

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  4. Learning Differences/Disabilities Links

    [ By on December 04, 2012 ]

    Learning Disabilities Association New York City - website National Center for Learning Disabilities - website The New York Branch of the International Dyslexia Association - website  

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  5. Five Misconceptions About Learning Disabilities

    [ By on December 04, 2012 ]

    From: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/03/five-misconceptions-about-learning-disabilities.html HEALTH -- March 16, 2012 at 5:34 PM EDT Five Misconceptions About Learning Disabilities By: Jason Kane Getty illustration by Zigy Kaluzny In the classroom, it starts simply -- sometimes with a struggle to sound out simple words; sometimes with trouble telling time, memorizing the times tables or learning left from right. It often ends simply, too: with a troubling statistic. One in five of the American students identified as having a learning disability will walk away from their education. That's compared to a dropout rate of 8 percent in the general population. Just as startling: Close to half of the secondary students currently identified as learning disabled ...

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  6. Overview of Typical Development (physical, social, mental, emotional) of Ten-to-Fourteen-Year-Olds

    [ By on December 03, 2012 ]

    From: "Your-Ten-To-Fourteen-Year-Old" by Louise Bates Ames, PhD, Frances L. Ilg, MD & Sidney M Baker, MD - Gesell Institute of Human Development   In this resource on typical development of children in middle school years, the authors highlight the importance of understanding the natural occurrence of alternating periods of equilibrium and disequilibrium. According to these authors, typical developmental patterns for the ten-to-fourteen-year-old child are as follows: Age 10 – Age of equilibrium, good adjustment, comfortable functioning internally and between child and others. Age 11 – Opposite of 10. A time of breaking up, discord and discomfort. It is a time of loosening up, of snapping old bonds, ...

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  7. Middle School — Developments in the Peer Group

    [ By on December 03, 2012 ]

    From: The Successful Parent Website Post: Beginning Middle School (link to entire post) Developments in the Peer Group Most sixth graders are eleven or twelve years old, which means that they will begin to show signs of early adolescence during the coming year. One of the most significant developments during early adolescence is a new interest in the peer group. The sixth grade peer group, like the fifth grade group, still consists primarily of same sex members. What's new is that there is a growing and deeper involvement in the group that facilitates a psychological shift away from the family and toward the peer group as the main source of self-esteem and ...

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