Posts in Relationships

The middle school years bridge the end of childhood and the beginning of adolescence. As children of different ages possess different capacities for relationships- kids in Middle School will also vary in terms of their capacity to relate and how they relate to the people in their lives. This section contains information about relationships of all types including: with adults and family members, with same and opposite sex peers — including issues of bullying and relational aggression– and issues of dating and intimacy for middle school-aged children.

Topics/Posts
* Changes in the Parent-Child Relationship -Middle School (related to helping your pre-teen successfully take on the new demands of middle school. )
* Middle School — Developments in the Peer Group
* Changes in the Parent-Child Relationship -Middle School (related to helping your pre-teen successfully take on the new demands of middle school.)
* Adolescents and Romantic Relationships
* Girls and Friendships

  1. Changes in the Parent-Child Relationship -Middle School (related to helping your pre-teen successfully take on the new demands of middle school. )

    [ By on December 03, 2012 ]

    Changes in the Parent-Child Relationship From -The Successful Parent Website post- Middle School (link to full post) There are many changes that occur in the parent-child relationship during early adolescence, but what we are concerned with here are those related to helping your pre-teen successfully take on the new demands of middle school. During elementary school parents often assist their children with basic school tasks. For many parents, it has become a regular practice to do some of the child's work for them and/or to rescue them when they forget to turn in assignments on time, forget due dates of projects, forget to bring supplies to school, and so forth. After ...

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  2. Middle School — Developments in the Peer Group

    [ By on December 03, 2012 ]

    From: The Successful Parent Website Post: Beginning Middle School (link to entire post) Developments in the Peer Group Most sixth graders are eleven or twelve years old, which means that they will begin to show signs of early adolescence during the coming year. One of the most significant developments during early adolescence is a new interest in the peer group. The sixth grade peer group, like the fifth grade group, still consists primarily of same sex members. What's new is that there is a growing and deeper involvement in the group that facilitates a psychological shift away from the family and toward the peer group as the main source of self-esteem and ...

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  3. Ask an Academic: The Secrets of Boys

    [ By on December 03, 2012 ]

    Ask an Academic: The Secrets of Boys The New Yorker - March 16, 2011 Posted by secrets.jpg In the late nineteen-eighties, Niobe Way worked as a counselor at an urban  public high school, where she spent hours each day listening to teen-agers,  especially boys, speak about their struggles with friendship, betrayal, and  heartbreak. Boys and men are often seen through stereotypes as emotionally  illiterate, stoic, and extremely independent. But that rings a bit false, as Way  remembers, because the boys she worked with were much more complicated. In her new book, “Deep  Secrets: Boys’ Friendships and the ...

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  4. Adolescents and Romantic Relationships

    [ By on November 29, 2012 ]

    The Wall Street JournalThe Wall Street JournalWall Street Journal - The Wall Street JournalWork and Family Why Puppy Love Matters for Parents Among all my endeavors as a parent of teenagers, understanding their affairs of the heart has been the most baffling. Mostly, my approach has been, "Hands off." New research suggests I might do better by meddling a bit. WORKFAM TIm Bower Long dismissed by researchers as trivial and fleeting, teen romance is emerging as a powerful factor in kids' development—one in which parents have a major role to play, new studies show. The romantic ties kids ...

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  5. Girls and Friendships

    [ By on November 08, 2012 ]

    Excerpts from PBS.ORG- parents/raising girls/friends For girls, friends form the center of their lives. Friends light up girls' days in preschool, become inseparable in elementary school, and help girls in middle school develop their own, separate lives. As girls grow up, it's not unusual for them to find best friends, break up, and reform friendships time and again. Looking on from the sidelines, parents sometimes agonize over their daughters' social lives. It's hard to watch your girl lose friends, get hurt by friends, and even hurt friends herself. Parents may not know what to do when their daughter comes home in tears because someone teased her, screams, "Don't call her, mother, please!" ...

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