Posts in December 2014

  1. Manslaughter Conviction For “Negligent Breastfeeding”

    [ By on December 17, 2014 ]

    Stephanie Greene, a 39 year old nurse was convicted of killing her six-week-old daughter by administering a morphine overdose through her breast-milk. Greene survived a severe traffic accident in 1998, and suffered from seizures, chronic pain, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Following the accident, Greene was taking multiple pain medications prescribed by a neurologist, in order to treat her pain disorder. The pain persisted over a course of 16 years, and didn’t go away. Therefore, in 2014, Greene was still taking pain medications. In early 2014, Greene had been breastfeeding, although she had been taking morphine. Usually, it is suggested that you don’t breastfeed if you take pain-killers. However, not breast feeding at all isn’t suggested because it can increase ...

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  2. Human Enhancement

    [ By on December 17, 2014 ]

    In this recent article in the Guardian newspaper, Kostas Kostarelos debates whether or not Human Enhancement should be restricted to certain people. Human Enhancement is the application of technology to overcome physical or mental restrictions of the body. Kostarelos touches on different types of developing technologies such as chips that can be implanted into the brain to increase memory and other implants that allow connectivity between brains. He also discusses the critical relationship between these new technologies aiding and enhancing human capability and at what point is human enhancement no longer moral. He finishes by stating that he believes it is ethical to allow human enhancement for disabled people and various other patient groups, but he asks, should we ...

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  3. What is the psychological effect violent video games have on teenage youth’s behavior?

    [ By on December 17, 2014 ]

    In this New York Times article Shooting In the Dark,  the effect (or lack thereof) of video game violence on behavior is questioned.   Written by the well-known writer Benedict Carey in 2013, the article pinpoints a great amount of scientific uncertainty regarding the idea that teenage violence is directly correlated to engaging in animated violence. Although it has been proven that “playing the games can and does stir hostile urges and mildly aggressive behavior in the short term” and that, “youngsters who develop a gaming habit can become slightly more aggressive,” it is not at all clear whether, over longer periods, such habits continue.  Carey further discusses the disparity between three common ...

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  4. The Use of Images in Anti-Abortion Protests/Websites

    [ By on December 17, 2014 ]

    Often times, a strategy used by anti-abortion organizations is to expose the public to graphic images of fetuses. The images tend to be very bloody and traumatizing. They usually depict fetuses aborted in the second or third trimester where they look more like a fully-formed baby. A lot of these photographs have been proven to be fake, suggesting that they are claiming fetuses to be more fully formed then they would be at the times they say they were aborted. Still, however, they are accurate in other ways. It is true that there is a lot of blood, etc. And even if they were real, is it still okay to show them to people? The dilemma here is should anti-abortion groups show ...

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  5. psychedelic drugs affects on the brain

    [ By on December 17, 2014 ]

    In this interesting article Giovanni Petri, a mathematician at Italy’s Institute for Scientific Interchange explains to us the true affects on the brain when taking "Shrooms". In recent years prior to this study he references the questions brought up through recent neurological advances such as how cells and regions interact, with consciousness shaped not by any given set of brain regions, but by their interplay. Petri proposes the idea that true "consciousness" can be found with in the discrete meta-networks within the brain. Using psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, and compared them to scans of their brain activity after receiving a placebo. Although the purpose for the experiment wasn't to have the patients trip. Psilocybin, alters the ...

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  6. Prenatal Testing

    [ By on December 17, 2014 ]

    It is possible that plenty of kids in our community have an issue that he or she does not know about. It can either be an issue that he or she has had since birth, or it can be one that is yet to come. Prenatal testing is something that women have the option to do before giving birth. Prenatal testing can detect many conditions that can affect the baby's health. However, many pregnant women do not want to go through this because they do not want to know about potential problems that their baby may have. This article tells a story about a woman who found out there was an increased chance that she was carrying with Down syndrome. Hearing ...

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  7. Helmets in Soccer

    [ By on December 17, 2014 ]

    Soccer is the worlds most polar sport played by more than 2 million people world wide. In a soccer game athletes take blows to the head rather regularly, some being more significant than others. Concussions have become quite prevalent in soccer and ideas to limit the number. The most popular method has been the use of a helmet. In this article it is explained that it is scientifically proven that wearing the helmet causes less trauma to the brain. Though on the other side of it explained here, wear a helmet has the potential negative effect of making people believe they are invincible to head injuries because they are wearing a helmet. This misconception can result in athletes ...

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  8. Cook County Jail is the Largest Mental Health Provider in Illinois

    [ By on December 17, 2014 ]

    Here is an interesting New York Times article about Cook County’s Jail, in Chicago, and its doubled role as a makeshift mental health institution and a jail. What's been happening for the past few years in this jail is pretty messed up. Those who seek psychiatric care, and cannot afford medication or a bed at a mental hospital, essentially must choose between two institutions--a public mental hospital or jail--where they can pursue mental recovery. With the closings of various clinics, however, the option of entering a public mental hospital isn’t exactly exercisable for these poorer Chicagoans. And so, these Chicagoans seek sanctuary and, specifically, medication, by committing offenses that will guarantee them a bed at the jail. Is it okay to essentially ...

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  9. New Concussion Protocol in the NFL

    [ By on December 15, 2014 ]

    As an aspiring college football player, one thing that worries me about my sport is the scrutiny it is under for the approach taken towards concussions, also known as "the c word." I found this intriguing article about the new concussion protocol in the National Football League. The reader is given an insight as to how the New York Giants team physician, Dr. Russell Warren, "tackles" the developing issue. The NFL is making great strides towards limiting the long term effects of concussions and making football a safer sport. After reading the article, what are your thoughts on the newly adopted concussion protocol. Does the NFL need to do more?

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  10. Growth Hormones in Society

    [ By on December 15, 2014 ]

    The use of Growth Hormones in modern society is frequently debated and in a recent article written by ABC correspondent, Jamie Cohen, both sides of the spectrum are described. Cohen first brings up the pro-growth hormone position, which is that kids who are shorter than average deserve treatment because kids who are short face much social adversity and can’t socially develop. Cohen then describes the counter argument to pro-growth hormone, which is that with society accepting treatment that fixes simple human characteristics, individuals will begin to feel pressure to change anything that is not normal about themselves. In my opinion both sides of the argument make sense and each have valid arguments. What are your thoughts on the use ...

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