#Explore: OTW to the Library

Making the library a physical and digital place to visit.

The RCS library is a main hub of activity for the Hill campus.  It is a collaborative space that serves the diverse needs of its community members.  It’s a meeting place, a workspace, and a space where people go to find answers. By design, the library layout sparks, fosters, and helps develop ideas to inspire further curiosity.  The purpose of my Summer Camp Pedagogy and Technology experience is to visually create displays that speak to the “successful” library visit. Through posters, visitors are directed to library resources and gently reminded of library etiquette that mindfully respects the space and others within the space.

“The Perfect Library Visit”

RCS Hill Campus Library

“[C]uriosity is more likely to flourish when kids are free
 to pursue their own interests alongside supportive adults 
who offer well-timed nudges to guide their explorations 
and keep their curiosity alive.” Bryan Goodwin

One of the important takeaways from Summer Pedagogy and Technology Camp was the importance of establishing classroom norms.  As a librarian, my classroom is the library. Over the course of the tech camp week, we reflected on class norms and classroom management.  It became evident that clearly defining the purpose of the library collaboration space and the effective use of the space would be useful in the user experience.

Although we published a dynamic new library website, local, non-digital reminders about the resources in the library collaboration spaces are appropriate.  Signage advertising writing and math help was always present, but only select users knew about the other resources we share in support of their work. At minimum, we provide comfortable spaces, laptops, and even pencils and pens, all in the interest of “Accomplishing Your Goals @ the RCS Library!”

Resource

Goodwin, Bryan.  Out of Curiosity: Restoring the Power of Hungry Minds for Better Schools, Workplaces, and Lives (McREL International, 2018).  

“Bryan Goodwin says that children’s inborn curiosity will be nurtured or extinguished, depending on the learning experiences they have.”

For more information contact: LaShawn Ross
lross@riverdale.edu

#ClickHere: Thinglink for International Book Selection

Looking to add more Interactivity in your Classroom? UsE Thinglink TO maKe a regular lesson into an interactive one.

 

Every month at Riverdale we celebrate a different countries represented within our community.  I wanted to find a way to represent the spotlight books of the month using my interactive whiteboard while making it interesting for the children.  I used Thinglink, a web based program to create this interactive map. The map spotlighted, Haiti, London, Russia, Dominican Republic, Israel, China, Nigeria and Ghana.  Each button pressed revealed a book from that country. Then the book when pressed revealed a summary. The children loved pressing the map and loved the books that were spotlighted.

For more information contact: Cydney Johnson
cjohnson@riverdale.edu

#ISPY: Library Scavenger Hunt

Looking for a way to Introduce new students, faculty and staff to An important space and its available resources? You might want to try a Scavenger Hunt.
               Evolution of the Scavenger Hunt Map

Library Map process

Canva was initially used to create map, but proved to be time consuming due to learning curve.  Hence, a hand drawn map was created – process attached. Team names were added to the maps to prevent overcrowding at the respective locations

Other elements of the scavenger hunt

QR CodesQR Codes A-F” were added so that students could follow a “route” which prevented them all starting at the same spot. Each QR Code also had QR Code Blurbs, descriptions of the library locations teams visited. Tokens, photo representations of the Team names were placed at each location.  Teams had to collect the token to “prove” they had visited the location.

Glows

  • The map was detailed and easy to follow.
  • The kids understood the symbolism of the Team names (Falcon, falcon, quill, and owl)  

Grows

  • I should have been more explicit about the activity NOT being a race.
  • I should have allowed students to keep maps for future use.  However, I think I probably would have seen the maps scattered all over campus.
  • The map was too detailed for the scope of the project.

Project Notes:

I am happy things went smoothly and students genuinely had a great time.  The, “This was SO much fun!” statement made my day.

However, in the course of having a great time I know that not all the groups actually READ the information contained in the QR Codes. To avoid this in the future I will:

  • Make it abundantly clear that the activity is NOT a race, and  
  • Create/include a knowledge check to ensure that students walk away meeting all the “Desired Results” for what they will “know” and “be able to do.”

Additionally, I am happy that students felt comfortable expressing themselves during the question and answer period.  Afterwards, one student asked if she could make a suggestion. The student thought the activity would have been more meaningful if the QR codes were on the books and part of the hunt was to locate the books.  I agree!!! This idea had been considered, but was not implemented given time constraints. However, some classes (that did not participate during orientation) may do the hunt during Home Base. That is an opportunity to implement that idea along with the inclusion of a knowledge check, or at the very least a more robust question and answer period.

Overall, this was a fun project and I liked using the tech (QR Monkey) I learned in camp.  I am currently contemplating a phase two.

Phase 2 could look something like:

  1. Have teachers actually do the scavenger hunt.
    1. NOTE: One new teacher actually DID the hunt. Feedback was that the hunt was helpful as a new teacher and knowing where he could find things.
  2. Frame the QR Codes around the library and present the information is a more user/reader friendly format, eg. infographic format OR have a tablet that has the library catalog AND the QR Codes on it.
  3. Make sure to include having participant FIND an item in the respective sections.
  4. Advertise the QR Codes on the NEW Library website – maybe. 
For more information contact: Tracy Smith
tsmith@riverdale.edu